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Off Topic: Wheels, Gears, Turbines, Whatever...

Discussion in 'The Ten Mile High Club' started by Jet News, Jan 20, 2013.

  1. Jet News

    Jet News JF News Editor Staff Member

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    JetPack for maned personal flight? This concept is becoming closer and closer to reality. Check out this video we found by Jetpack Aviation

  2. Jet News

    Jet News JF News Editor Staff Member

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  3. Jet News

    Jet News JF News Editor Staff Member

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    Saw this on social media

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  4. Jet News

    Jet News JF News Editor Staff Member

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    UK start-up HAV – which originally developed the 92m (302ft)-long type in partnership with Northrop Grumman for a defunct US Army programme – is repositioning the Airlander 10 as an aircraft suitable for carrying sightseers, surveillance equipment or specialist cargo, and hopes to fly it 'within weeks' they suggest.

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  5. Jet News

    Jet News JF News Editor Staff Member

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    A bit of humour...

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  6. HTMO9

    HTMO9 Senior Member

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    Do you really believe, pilots are any better?

    ACCREW.JPG

    Ask Norseman, he could tell :D.
  7. Kevin

    Kevin JF Moderator

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    Bringing this thread back up with something I came across today that absolutely astounded me:

    In the 1960s, prior to NASA sending humans to land on the moon they had to first figure out a very important detail: where to land!

    If you've ever seen the early photos of the moon prior to the Apollo missions, you may have noticed lines in the images. What were those lines?

    Up until that time the photos on hand were taken from the Earth, or a few of the earliest satellites. These weren't nearly detailed enough to use to decide a landing spot. In 1966 & 67 NASA built and launched 5 satellites for the specific purpose of photographing the moon from a lunar orbit, and - get this - develop those pictures while in orbit of the moon, scan then, and send them back to Earth for analysis.

    Yes, they made a photo booth, analog image scanner (hence, the line patterns in the early images), and fax machine... in space!

    National Geographic Link

    Kodak Eastman developed (no pun intended) a system to process the film using chemical infused gelatin instead of the usual liquids, because, ya' know... liquids in space doesn't exactly work. Then once the film was developed they "scanned" it using a light that was shone through the film, the intensity of which was recorded, converted to radio signal, and transmitted to Earth, where it was recorded on magnetic tape which could then be translated back into a photograph!!!

    This is a diagram of the system: BIMAT

    All this... in the mid 1960s! :eek:
  8. Jet News

    Jet News JF News Editor Staff Member

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    What about this partially prop powered Boeing 727 back in 1984...it was called the 7J7 with an unducted fan.

  9. Jet News

    Jet News JF News Editor Staff Member

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  10. thomas

    thomas New Member

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    I like it!
  11. Jet News

    Jet News JF News Editor Staff Member

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    Hey Thomas, what do you think about the feasibility of this, will it come in to mainstream production?
  12. thomas

    thomas New Member

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    It is intriguing for sure. I did a little reading on it, and apparently the 4 rotors are electric, and there is only 25 hours of test time on the helicopter itself. I don't know much about electric powered vehicles, but I know one of the struggles is that operation time before needing a recharge is not long at all. I am wondering if this will limit the length of time one could fly this helicopter. I am sure they are continuing to develop it to be able to have a solid flight time. But I definitely think it looks cool and is a neat concept, but I think it is going to take some time to develop the electric motor and test the helicopter itself more. There is also the question of cost. It may cost more up front, but maintenance costs less, so balancing that to be truly cost effective for the consumer is big as well. So I think it is feasible, just needs a little time.
  13. HTMO9

    HTMO9 Senior Member

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    There are fore sure several reasons for this developement.

    First, the Fenestron (the shrouded tail rotor) is more effective, less noisy and safer (in the air and even more during ground ops) than the conventional tail rotor. But the Fenestron is property of Eurocopter / Airbus.

    Second, a mechanical driven tail rotor or Fenestron takes quite a lot of power from the propulsion system of any helicopter and has to be dimensioned for the highest possible demand (heavy load take off and landing plus hovering) while during horizontal flight, he is overdimensioned, because the fixed tail and vertical surfaces of the tail assembly compensate most of the torque of the main rotor.

    Here comes the Bell quad electrical shrouded tail rotor into play. 4 little electric (DC) motors with onboard generated electric power, provide sufficient counter torque to control the helo below transition speed. As soon as the bird is above this transition speed (usally between 40 and 60 Kts) much less counter torque is neccessary and several of the quad rotors can be switched off. Only the steering force needed around the vertical axis has to be provided.

    And this assembly does not violate Airbus property, because it is a new idea. During cruise, this setup will be less noisy, safe fuel and increase overall performance of the helicopter. And by assuming, that this setup eliminates a lot of mechanical components (several gears, bearings, shafts, steering rods, etc.), it may increase the usefull load of the helicopter.

    It will be true fly by wire for the tail assembly. If it really works and gets certified, it is IMHO a very smart move by Bell Helicopters to get back into the game with Airbus Helicopters.

    Full electric helicopters for every day commercial and corporate use will not be seen for many years. May be some kind of hybrid propulsion, means electric rotor(s) and steering fans provided with electric power by a gas turbine but without heavy batteries, will be seen in the near future.

    But when this fancy birds will be on the market, I will be watching the flowers growing from below surface.

    Just my 2 (Euro) cents.
  14. Kevin

    Kevin JF Moderator

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    We had a particularly large visitor to the Montreal airspace yesterday... one Antonov AN124 bringing medical PPE supplies.

    (The AN225 Mriya is due in on Sunday... may get out to the airport for that one as well.)

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  15. Jet News

    Jet News JF News Editor Staff Member

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  16. Jet News

    Jet News JF News Editor Staff Member

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  17. Jet News

    Jet News JF News Editor Staff Member

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  18. Jet News

    Jet News JF News Editor Staff Member

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    If you are into Dams or just appreciate the design engineering and the sheer scale of these structures.

  19. Jet News

    Jet News JF News Editor Staff Member

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    What became of the Airlander 10? Alot has gone quiet with this project and I suppose with the Corona Virus playing a hand in what might have been the potential sale of the first aircraft to a customer. Hybrid Air Vehicles (HAV) will have to look at new ways to market this very large aircraft to make it viable. One of the ways is looking at it as a regional air transporter.

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  20. Jet News

    Jet News JF News Editor Staff Member

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    General Electric GEnx 1B 3D printed scale engine, a model of the same type in operation on some Boeing 787s.